8 January 1969*, Pb 111/162

Politburo decision. Set up an “International Fund to aid Left-wing, Workers’ Organizations”. Fund total, $16.5 million; Soviet contribution, $14 million (4 pp). [R 8 January 1969, Pb 111-162]

=========================================================

[page one of four]

Workers of all Lands, Unite!

[Text in top left hand corner of page]
Must be returned within 24 hours
to CPSU Central Committee (General Department, sector 1)

COMMUNIST PARTY OF THE SOVIET UNION. CENTRAL COMMITTEE

No. Pb 111 / 162

To Comrade Ponomarev (all paragraphs)
Comrade Poskonov (paragraph 2)

STRICTLY SECRET
SPECIAL FILE

Excerpt from Minute No. 111
of the Central Committee Politburo meeting on 8 January 1969

A request from the International Department of the CPSU Central Committee

  1. Adopt the proposal of the CPSU Central Committee International Department to set up an International Fund to Aid Left-wing Workers’ Organisations for 1969 to the value of 16,550,000 dollars and establish the contribution of the CPSU to the Fund as 14,000,000 dollars.
  2. Instruct the board of the USSR State Bank (Comrade Poskonov) to provide Ponomarev, B.N., with 14,000,000 dollars for special purposes.
  3. Instruct the CPSU Central Committee International Department to inform the leaders of the Communist Parties participating in the International Fund as to the expenditure of the Fund in 1968, and reach agreement with them that the Fund should amount to 16,550,000 dollars for 1969 with a contribution from each party of the following levels:
  • from the Czechoslovak Communist Party500,000 dollars
  • from the Rumanian Communist Party  – 500,000 dollars

[page 2]

  • from the Polish United Workers Party500,000 dollars
  • from the Hungarian Socialist Workers Party500,000 dollars
  • from the Bulgarian Communist Party350,000 dollars
  • from the Socialist Unity Party of [East] Germany200,000 dollars

SECRETARY OF THE CENTRAL COMMITTEE


[page three]

Workers of all Lands, Unite!

[Text in top left hand corner of page]
Must be returned within 24 hours
to CPSU Central Committee (General Department, sector 1)

COMMUNIST PARTY OF THE SOVIET UNION. CENTRAL COMMITTEE

No. Pb 111 / 163

To Comrade Ponomarev (all paragraphs)
Comrade Poskonov (paragraph 2)

STRICTLY SECRET
SPECIAL FILE

Excerpt from Minute No. 111
of the Central Committee Politburo meeting, on 8 January 1969

A request from the International Department of the CPSU Central Committee

  1. Provide financial aid in 1969 to:
  • The Italian Communist Party (for first six months of 1969) – 3,700,000 dollars
  • The French Communist Party – 2,000,000 dollars
  • The US Communist Party – 1,000,000 dollars
  • The Italian Socialist Party of Proletarian Unity – 700,000 dollars
  • The Chilean Communist Party – 350,000 dollars
  • The Venezuelan Communist Party – 300,000 dollars
  • The Indian Communist Party – 300,000 dollars
  • The Brazilian Communist Party – 200,000 dollars
  • The Greek Communist Party – 100,000 dollars
  • The People’s Movement for the Liberation of Angola – 100,000 dollars
  • The Canadian Communist Party – 100,000 dollars
  • The Syrian Communist Party – 100,000 dollars
  • The Danish Communist Party – 100,000 dollars
  • The Guatemalan Labour Party – 100,000 dollars
  • The Dominican Communist Party – 100,000 dollars

[page four]

  • The Ecuador Communist Party – 100,000 dollars
  • The Swiss Labour Party – 80,000 dollars
  • The People’s Avantgarde of Costa Rica – 70,000 dollars
  • The Somalian Democratic Union – 70,000 dollars
  • The Salvador Communist Party – 70,000 dollars
  • The Zimbabwe African People’s Union (S. Rhodesia) – 60,000 dollars
  • The Portuguese Communist Party – 50,000 dollars
  • The Venezuelan Party of National Union – 50,000 dollars
  • The Uruguayan Communist Party – 50,000 dollars
  • The Haiti Party of Nation Union – 40,000 dollars
  • The Nicaraguan Socialist Party – 40,000 dollars
  • The Bolivian Communist Party – 30,000 dollars
  • The Finnish Communist Party – 30,000 dollars
  • The Honduras Communist Party – 30,000 dollars
  • The Lesotho Communist Party – 20,000 dollars
  • The Iranian Communist Party “ 20,000 dollars
  • The Martinique Communist Party – 20,000 dollars
  • The Front for the Liberation of Mozambique – 10,000 dollars
  • The chairman of the Sri Lanka Communist Party, Comrade Vikremasithke – 6,000 dollars

Transfer of these funds is entrusted to the KGB (Comrade Andropov)

SECRETARY OF THE CENTRAL COMMITTEE

==========================================================

NOTES
The British Communist Party (CPGB), which is absent from this and subsequent lists of the Fund’s disbursements, reportedly received £100,000 a year from Moscow between 1957 and the mid-1970s (see Anderson & Davey, Moscow Gold? The Soviet Union and the British Left, Woodbridge, UK, 2013, p. 102 fn).
General
1. Notes by translator and editor are bracketed, thus [ ];
2. text written by hand is indicated in italic script;
3. when a handwritten phrase, figure or word has been added
to a previously typed document this is indicated by underlined italic script.
Translation, John Crowfoot
Posted in 5. CPSU & Communist world, 7. Communist subversion, 7.1 in the West, 7.2 in the Middle East, 7.3 in Africa, 7.4 in Latin America

23 January 1991*, Pb 223

Moscow Party Committee to CPSU Central Committee. Report on a vast anti-Gorbachev demonstration in the centre of the Soviet capital following the January events in Lithuania. [R 20 January 1991, Pb 223]

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20 January 1991, Moskva

============================================================

[page one of two]

Return to the Protocol sector of the CPSU Central Committee General Department
[vertical text on left margin – “Return within 15 days”]

Pb-223, 23 January 1991

Sent to Politburo members and Secretaries of the CPSU Central Committee
To Comrades V.S. Pavlov, V.A. Kryuchkov, B.K. Pugo, D.T. Yazov,
A.A. Bessmertnykh, A.N. Ilyn

To the CPSU Central Committee

MEMORANDUM
About the 20 January 1991 demonstration

On 20 January a demonstration with permission from Mossoviet was held from 11 am to 2.30 pm. It was organised on the initiative of a number of USSR People’s Deputies and the coordinating council of the Democratic Russia movement. The column of demonstrators marched from Mayakovsky Square along the Garden Ring and Kalinin Avenue to the 50th Anniversary of October Square [Manege Square], where a 90-minute rally was held.

Up to 150,000 people took part in the demonstration. The composition of the organisations and politicised movements involved was traditional. Expert evaluation indicates that representatives of the scientific and creative intelligentsia were predominant among those taking part, as were persons from ethnic groups not to be found in Moscow, and also people from outside the capital.

Twenty six people spoke at the rally, over which USSR People’s Deputy Yu. Afanasyev presided: 11 USSR People’s Deputies, 9 RSFSR People’s Deputies, and also representatives and deputies of the Supreme Soviets of Lithuania, Estonia, Azerbaijan, Georgia and Armenia. G. Burbulis read an appeal by B.N. Yeltsin to the nations of Russia.

The rally was clearly anti-presidential and anti-communist in tendency. Among the characteristic slogans were “Mikhail Bloody-hand, Nobel laureate”, “Put Gorbachev and his gang on trial”, “Put the Soviet President in the dock”, “The bloodshed in Lithuania is the latest crime of the CPSU”, “Red Fascists of the CPSU – hands off Russia and the Baltic”.

Of the 33 main themes raised in the slogans and speeches, the anti-presidential theme came first, the anti-communist theme, second; support for the present leadership in Lithuania, third; support for Yeltsin, fourth.

———————————————————

[page two]

The great attention paid to “restrictions” on glasnost, calls for the sacking of Kravchenko and sharp condemnation of Nevzorov was notable.[1]

There were a great many demands to put the Committees for National Salvation on trial and to reject “the reactionary course of Gorbachev and the CPSU”, even to the point of a political strike throughout Russia (from the resolution adopted at the rally) and armed resistance “if force was used” (T. Gdlyan).

During the rally the names of Yakovlev, Sheverdnadze and Bakatin were repeatedly mentioned as victims of the change in the USSR President’s political course. Appeals were made to “honest communists” to leave the Party.

The resolution adopted contained a demand for “the withdrawal of punitive forces from the Baltic republics ”, the dismissal of Gorbachev M.S. and Yanaev, G.I., the dissolution of the USSR Congress of People’s Deputies and USSR Supreme Soviet, the creation of a Russian army, and calls for the formation of a political organisation based on the Democratic Russia movement with party cells in the workplace and at home.

In our opinion, this demonstration should be seen as a confirmation of the course taken by opposition forces to change the State and social system and to remove the present leadership of the country from the political arena.

The tactics of the forces opposing the centre and the CPSU have changed qualitatively. The RSFSR Supreme Soviet under the leadership of B.N. Yeltsin has become the core for the consolidation of democratic and national-democratic movement s in the republics.

For your information

Secretary of the Moscow City Committee of the CPSU, Yu. Prokovyev

No 8

22 January 1991

===========================================================

NOTES
[1] Leonid Kravchenko was head of the USSR State Committee for Radio and Television (Gosteleradio). Appointed by Gorbachev in November 1990, he was removed by Boris Yeltsin in August 1991 after the failed putsch in Moscow.
In January 1991 TV journalist Alexander Nevzorov made a film (“Nashi”), praising the role of the Vilnius riot police during the events in Lithuania.
General
1. Notes by translator and editor are bracketed, thus [ ];
2. text written by hand is indicated in italic script;
3. when a handwritten phrase, figure or word has been added
to a previously typed document this is indicated by underlined italic script.
Translation, John Crowfoot
Posted in 4. Perestroika | Tagged | 1 Comment

11 January 1991* (No 00766)

Central Committee. Report from Committee officials in Lithuania about the attempted takeover by the “Committee for National Salvation” (4 pp). [R 11 Jan 91]

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[page one of four]

To the CPSU Central Committee

About the events in Lithuania

Senior staff of the [CPSU] Central Committee (Comrades Kazyulin and Udovichenko) who are in Lithuania, report that the House of the Press and DOSAAF (where the regional defence department is located) in Vilnius and the officers’ mess in Kaunas have been brought under control of the paratroopers. This operation was carried out, overall, without major clashes. At the same time it must be noted that the information issued on the Mayak radio station about these events was not objective. In particular, it was reported that the military had committed outrages and, supposedly, that there are victims and casualties.

At 5 pm local time there was a press conference at the Central Committee of the Lithuanian Communist Party at which the head of the Ideological Department, Comrade Yermolavicius, reported that a Committee for the National Salvation of Lithuania had been set up in the republic. This committee declares that it is taking full control. It is based at the radio-measuring instruments factory (director, O. Burdenko). The committee has adopted an appeal to the people of Lithuania, and also sent an ultimatum to the Supreme Soviet of the Lithuanian SSR, in which it demands an immediate reaction to the appeal by the USSR President [Gorbachev].

The Supreme Soviet of the Lithuanian SSR has rejected this ultimatum, calling the Committee “impostors” without the legal right to speak on behalf of the people of Lithuania.

For your information

Head of the CPSU Central Committee Department
for national [inter-ethnic] relations

[signed] V. Mikhailov

11 January 1991

—————————————————-

[pages two to four –
indicate that nine Secretaries of the Central Committee read this report.]

===========================================================

NOTES
General
1. Notes by translator and editor are bracketed, thus [ ];
2. text written by hand is indicated in italic script;
3. when a handwritten phrase, figure or word has been added
to a previously typed document this is indicated by underlined italic script.
Translation, John Crowfoot
Posted in 2.2 post-1975, 4. Perestroika

24 October 1990*, Pb 1193

Politburo. Report about the founding congress of the “Democratic Russia” movement and its anti-Communist stance (7 pp). [R 24 Oct 90, 7 pp – Pb 1193] Excerpt.

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[page one of seven]

No Pb 1193
24 October 1990

To Members of the CPSU Central Committee Politburo,
Secretaries of the CPSU Central Committee,
members of the USSR President’s council, plus Comrades Pugo and Orlov

Information from Comrade Polozkov about the founding congress
of the Democratic Russia movement (20-21 October 1990)

Print 60 copies

—————————————————-

[Page two]

Return to the CPSU Central Committee (General Department, 1st sector)
PB-1193 [vertical text on left margin – Return within 15 days]

Sent to Politburo members, Secretaries of the CPSU Central Committee
and members of the USSR President’s council

To the Politburo of the CPSU Central Committee

The congress was attended by 1,270 delegates from 73 regions and autonomous republics, representatives of parties, non-governmental organisations and movements opposed to the CPSU: the Democratic Party of Russia, the Social Democratic Party of the Russian Federation, the Democratic Platform, the Constitutional Democratic Party, the Peasants’ Party of Russia, the Party of Free Labour, the Russian Christian Democratic Movement, April [writer’s organisation], the Conference of Labour, Memorial, the Association of Leaseholders, the Young Russia organisation, Shield [army organisation] and others.

Twenty-three USSR People’s Deputies, 104 RSFSR People’s Deputies, deputies from Mossoviet and Lensoviet and other local soviets took part in the work of the Congress. More than 200 guests were invited to the congress from the union republics, and also from the USA, Britain, FRG, France, Japan, Poland and the Czechoslovak Republic. The work of the congress was covered by about 300 Soviet and foreign correspondents.

The main attention of the congress was on the organisational strengthening of the democratic movement in its struggle against “the monopoly of the CPSU on power”, the creation of an information network of democratic forces and their political infrastructure, the activisation of the masses and the holding of joint protests with other opposition movements.

———————————————————–

[page three]

The organising centre of all the work of the founding congress of the Democratic Russia movement were the USSR People’s Deputies Yu. Afanasyev and A. Murashov, and the RSFSR People’s Deputies V. Dmitriev, V. Lysenko and L. Ponomaryov.

The discussion was chaotic, anti-democratic and the established procedures were [often] infringed. The distinguishing feature of the congress was its rabid anti-communism. Strategy and tactics were developed for removing the CPSU from the political arena and the dismantling of the existing State and political system. […]

The congress exposed the contradictory nature of the movement. From the very beginning a difference was revealed between representatives of the parties taking part in the work of the congress. These differences and contradictions did not extend beyond the limits of the anti-communist platform that united them all, and mainly concerned personal ambitions and claims to leadership. […]

——————————————————-

[page four]

[…] There were unbridled attacks at the congress on the USSR President M.S. Gorbachev, the chairman of the USSR Supreme Soviet A.I. Lukyanov, the chairman of the USSR Council of Ministers N.I. Ryzhkov, the chairman of the USSR KGB V.A. Kryuchkov and the USSR Minister of Defence D.T. Yazov

[…] The harsh and uncompromising tone of the documents adopted by the congress is noteworthy. In essence, all of them are a call for confrontation, civil disobedience and a further destabilisation of the situation within the country.

—————————————————–

[page five]

An analysis of the documents adopted by the founding congress, the nature of the speeches, the entire atmosphere of the congress and campaign that led up to its opening provide irrefutable evidence that a united bloc of antisocialist, anticommunist forces has been created to undermine the socio-political foundations of the country, seize power and remove the CPSU from the political arena. […]

—————————————————–

[page seven]

Member of the CPSU Central Committee Politburo
First Secretary of the Central Committee of the RSFSR Communist Party

I. Polozkov

Print 60 copies

24 October 1990

==========================================================

NOTES
General
1. Notes by translator and editor are bracketed, thus [ ];
2. text written by hand is indicated in italic script;
3. when a handwritten phrase, figure or word has been added
to a previously typed document this is indicated by underlined italic script.
Tr. JC
Posted in 1. CPSU, Ideology & Politics, 4. Perestroika